University of Mary Washington Then & Now

A Photography Exhibition

Posts in the Residence Buildings category

Alvey was built in 1989, next to Goolrick Hall. Originally known as North Hall, the dormitory was officially named after Edward Alvey Jr, Dean of the Faculty from 1936 to 1971. With its opening in 1990, Alvey helped relieve overcrowding pressure which had been building in many of the other residence halls. It is identical to Arrington Hall, which was built in 1994.1 The 148-room dorm has a more modern style than some of the older residence halls and includes features such as air-conditioning. This garnered Alvey the title of “‘The Hilton of the campus'” in The Bullet at that time.2

Alvey Then Resized

Dean Edward Alvey in front of Alvey Hall, 1991
"Dean Edward Alvey in front of Alvey Hall," June 1991, UMW Archives, University of Mary Washington.

Alvey Now Resized

Alvey, 2014
Alexandria Parrish, “Alvey,” February 19 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parrish. University of Mary Washington.

 

Show 2 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 375.
  2. University of Mary Washington, The Bullet, 1990, as quoted in Crawley, University of Mary Washington, 375.

Arrington was built in 1994, near Alvey. Dubbed “New Dorm” in its early days, the dormitory was officially named after Arabelle Laws Arrington, Class of 1941, who was an avid supporter of Mary Washington. It too helped relieve overcrowding pressures in many of the other residence halls across campus. It is almost an exact copy of its neighbor Alvey Hall, which was built in 1989. The 148-room dorm has a more modern style than some of the older residence halls and includes features such as air-conditioning. Arrington holds the unique position of being “the last dormitory constructed on campus in the College’s  first century.”1

Arrington Then Resized

Construction of Arrington Hall, 1993
"Construction of Arrington Hall," February 1993, UMW Archives, University of Mary Washington.

Arrington Now Resized

Arrington Hall, 2014
Alexandria Parrish, "Arrington Hall," March 21, 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parrish. University of Mary Washington.

 

 

Show 1 footnote

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 375.

As quoted in University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008, the 1977 Bullet described Ball Hall as “The home of sophisticated girls, mostly seniors and lucky underclassmen…who act with a touch of class. Some noses are carried so high that…they are in danger of drowning in heavy rain.”1

Ball Hall, originally named Mary Ball Hall after George Washington’s mother, was completed in 1935. This dormitory is the central building in a tri-unit dorm structure that included Madison and Custis Halls on either side of it. Located right on Ball Circle across from Virginia Hall, this dormitory  possesses an elegance that is lacking in newer, purely utilitarian dorms; Ball Hall boasts a grand entrance with a large reception area,  a circular stairway extending to an amber skylight three floors above, and two fine parlors illuminated by crystal chandeliers and wall sconces. 2 Today, Ball Hall houses 105 women, second year or above, in double occupancy rooms with suite baths.3

Front View of Ball Hall

Ball Hall 2014
Alexandria Parrish, "Ball Hall 2014," March 21, 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parrish, University of Mary Washington.

 

 

Show 3 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 244.
  2. Ibid., 33.
  3. University of Mary Washington Residence Life, “Ball Hall,” University of Mary Washington, http://students.umw.edu/residencelife/ball/ (Accessed April 15, 2014).

Bushnell Hall was completed in 1959 and could house up to 144 students. It was named after Nina Bushnell, a former dean at the College. As noted in University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008, Bushnell Hall was also the “first dorm to house students from all four classes in the same building.”1

On December 5, 1980, Bushnell Hall caught on fire.2 Fortunately, none of the residents were injured, but the fourth-floor residents did need temporary alternative housing due to the damages caused by the fire.3 Bushnell was able to reopen in January for the start of the spring semester.4 The total cost of repairing the residence hall was “approximately $80,000.”5

Following the reopening, lighter incidents occurred in Bushnell Hall such as the scandalous “male strip tease shows” that took place throughout the 1980s.6 As quoted in University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 a 1984 Bullet review entitled “Bushnell Bares the Beef,” described “‘MWC’s own ‘Chippendales’ hopped about…sporting black pants, bow ties and glistening muscular chests,’” they were “egged on by cries of ‘Take it off!’”7

Today, Bushnell Hall is a co-ed suite freshman residence hall that houses 151 students. Bushnell Hall has accommodations for both double and quad occupancy rooms with suite bathrooms.8

Bushnell Hall, December 21, 1964

Bushnell Hall, December 21, 1964
"Bushnell Hall," December 21, 1964, Battlefield, 1964, UMW Archives, University of Mary Washington.

Bushnell, February 19, 2014

Bushnell, February 19, 2014
Jessica Reingold, "Bushnell," February 19, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

Front View of Bushnell, February 19, 2014

Front View of Bushnell, February 19, 2014
Jessica Reingold, "Bushnell," February 19, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

Show 8 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 82.
  2. Ibid., 274
  3. Crawley, 276
  4. Ibid., 277
  5. Ibid.
  6. Ibid., 428
  7. Ibid.
  8. University of Mary Washington Residence Life, “Bushnell Hall,” University of Mary Washington, http://students.umw.edu/residencelife/bushnell/ (Accessed April 4, 2014).

Completed in 1935 as part of a tri-unit dorm facility along with Ball and Madison Halls, Custis Hall was named after Mary Anne Randolf Custis Lee, the wife of general Robert E. Lee.1 Today it houses 42 upperclass men and women. 2

Custis Hall

Custis Hall 1966
"Custis Hall," July 21, 1966, UMW Digital Archives, University of Mary Washington.

Custis Now

Custis Hall 2014
Alexandria Parrish, "Custis Hall," February 19, 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parrish, University of Mary Washington.

 

Show 2 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), page 33.
  2. University of Mary Washington Residence Life, “Custis Hall,” University of Mary Washington, http://students.umw.edu/residencelife/custis/(Accessed April 15, 2014).

UMW purchased Framar House in 1946 from Dr. Frank H. Reichel and his wife Marion. The name of the building is a combination of Frank (Fra) and Marion (mar). The house was originally used as the president’s house until Brompton House replaced it in 1948, and thereafter was used as a dormitory residence. The original purchase from Dr. and Mrs. Reichel included the brick residence, a five-room guesthouse and garage, a swimming pool and picnic area, and a rose and boxwood garden as part of a seven and a half acre tract. The purchase was a vital addition to the school as it made the campus a contiguous unit. The house was mostly known as the “Spanish house” or “leadership house”. 1 In the late 1950s, Framar was one of the first dorms to partake in the volunteer, non credit seminars initiated by students and organized by philosophy professor George Von Sant. These seminars quickly became popular and many other residence buildings followed suit.  Today, Framar is the home of the International Living Center (ILC) and holds 21 students. 2

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Framar House, 2014
Jessica Reingold, "Framar House," February 19, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington

Show 2 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 56.
  2. Ibid., 533.

Jefferson Hall opened in 1967, could house 195 students, and was named for Thomas Jefferson.1 The residence hall included several innovative features such as “the campus’s first dorm elevator, a cluster arrangement of rooms that included kitchenettes, and a number of single rooms for students who desired privacy.”2 Continuing through 1977, Jefferson Hall was an upperclassmen residence hall. As quoted in University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008, both Jefferson and Russell halls acquired a personality described in the 1977 Bullet as, “Household words at UVa, U. of R., and Randy Mac. The ladies there are the darlings of the preps, and on most Friday and Saturday nights their dorm is the scene of more passes than a school of quarterbacks.”3

Jefferson Hall today is a co-ed, freshman residence hall that houses approximately 192 students. The residence hall has both double and triple rooms with hall bathrooms.4

Jefferson Hall, n.d.

Jefferson Hall, n.d.
"Jefferson Hall," n.d., UMW Archives, University of Mary Washington.

Jefferson, February 19, 2014

Jefferson, February 19, 2014
Jessica Reingold, "Jefferson," February 19, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

Show 4 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 82.
  2. Ibid.
  3. Ibid., 244.
  4. University of Mary Washington Residence Life, “Jefferson Hall,” University of Mary Washington, http://students.umw.edu/residencelife/jefferson/ (Accessed April 4, 2014).

Originally a bridge, “The Link” was constructed in 2012 as a connecting building between Randolph Hall and Mason Hall.  It serves as a meeting and study space for students at UMW.

The bridge between Randolph and Mason, no date H. Bagby, "Bridge between Randolph and Mason Halls," H. Bagby Collection, Simpson Library Special Collections, University of Mary Washington

The Bridge Between Randolph and Mason, n.d.
H. Bagby, "Bridge between Randolph and Mason Halls," H. Bagby Collection, Simpson Library Special Collections, University of Mary Washington.

The Link, 2014 Jessica Reingold, "The Link," February 19, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

The Link, 2014
Jessica Reingold, "The Link," February 19, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

 

Madison Hall was completed in 1935 and is named for Dolly Payne Madison, wife of James Madison.1 It is one of three buildings that collectively comprise the Tri-Unit, along with Ball and Custis Halls. Centrally located, Madison is a co-ed, upper-class residence that houses 41 students and is home to the Gender Neutral Housing Community. 2

Madison Hall, 2014

Madison Hall 2014
Alexandria Parrish, "Madison Hall," March 21, 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parrish, University of Mary Washington.

Show 2 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), page 33.
  2. University of Mary Washington Residence Life, “Madison Hall,” University of Mary Washington, http://students.umw.edu/residencelife/madison/ (Accessed April 15, 2014).

Marshall Hall was built in 1960 and is a 144 bed residence hall. The building was named in honor of Mary Willis Ambler Marshall, wife of the esteemed Chief Justice John Marshall. Located at the bottom of “Marshall Hill”, below Russell Hall, Framar House, and South Hall, it is considered one of the more secluded dorms on campus. 1

Marshall then

Marshall Hall
"Marshall Hall," n.d., UMW Archives, University of Mary Washington

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Marshall Hall, 2014
Jessica Reingold, "Marshall Hall," February 19, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington

Show 1 footnote

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 82.
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