University of Mary Washington Then & Now

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Posts in the Structural category

Alvey was built in 1989, next to Goolrick Hall. Originally known as North Hall, the dormitory was officially named after Edward Alvey Jr, Dean of the Faculty from 1936 to 1971. With its opening in 1990, Alvey helped relieve overcrowding pressure which had been building in many of the other residence halls. It is identical to Arrington Hall, which was built in 1994.1 The 148-room dorm has a more modern style than some of the older residence halls and includes features such as air-conditioning. This garnered Alvey the title of “‘The Hilton of the campus'” in The Bullet at that time.2

Alvey Then Resized

Dean Edward Alvey in front of Alvey Hall, 1991
"Dean Edward Alvey in front of Alvey Hall," June 1991, UMW Archives, University of Mary Washington.

Alvey Now Resized

Alvey, 2014
Alexandria Parrish, “Alvey,” February 19 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parrish. University of Mary Washington.

 

Show 2 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 375.
  2. University of Mary Washington, The Bullet, 1990, as quoted in Crawley, University of Mary Washington, 375.

According to University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008, when the amphitheater was “Completed in 1923, it was built into a natural slope in a grove of trees just below the main campus and could initially accommodate approximately eight hundred people, a capacity that was doubled some years later.” 1  Dedicated on May 11, 1923, “the amphitheater was an impressive venue” 2 that served as the site for many campus events, such as senior plays, May Day performances, and commencement; however, as the campus expanded, the amphitheater was used less frequently. 3

The University of Mary Washington announced in March 2014 that Robert S. and Alice Andrews Jepson ’64 donated a $1 million challenge gift towards the restoration of the amphitheater.  Though a timeline for the project has not yet been released, sources say that “the restoration would return the amphitheater to its 1952-1953 appearance by repairing and reconstructing damaged and missing pieces. It would provide seating for approximately 600 people on weather-resilient benches and chairs while incorporating accommodations for ADA accessibility.” 4

Amphitheater Now

Amphitheater, 2014
Carly Winfield, "Amphitheater," March 21, 2014, Personal Collection of Carly Winfield, University of Mary Washington.

new amphitheater rendering

Amphitheater, future
Train & Partners Architects, Future Rendering of UMW Amphitheather, http://www.umw.edu/news/2014/03/01/jepsons-give-1-million-to-restore-umw-amphitheater/.

Show 4 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley, Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 22.
  2. Ibid., 23.
  3. Ibid., 23.
  4. Brynn Boyer, “Jepsons Give $1 Million to Restore UMW Amphitheater,” Media and Public Relations, University of Mary Washington, posted on March 1, 2014, http://www.umw.edu/news/2014/03/01/jepsons-give-1-million-to-restore-umw-amphitheater/ (Accessed April 6, 2014).

Arrington was built in 1994, near Alvey. Dubbed “New Dorm” in its early days, the dormitory was officially named after Arabelle Laws Arrington, Class of 1941, who was an avid supporter of Mary Washington. It too helped relieve overcrowding pressures in many of the other residence halls across campus. It is almost an exact copy of its neighbor Alvey Hall, which was built in 1989. The 148-room dorm has a more modern style than some of the older residence halls and includes features such as air-conditioning. Arrington holds the unique position of being “the last dormitory constructed on campus in the College’s  first century.”1

Arrington Then Resized

Construction of Arrington Hall, 1993
"Construction of Arrington Hall," February 1993, UMW Archives, University of Mary Washington.

Arrington Now Resized

Arrington Hall, 2014
Alexandria Parrish, "Arrington Hall," March 21, 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parrish. University of Mary Washington.

 

 

Show 1 footnote

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 375.

As quoted in University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008, the 1977 Bullet described Ball Hall as “The home of sophisticated girls, mostly seniors and lucky underclassmen…who act with a touch of class. Some noses are carried so high that…they are in danger of drowning in heavy rain.”1

Ball Hall, originally named Mary Ball Hall after George Washington’s mother, was completed in 1935. This dormitory is the central building in a tri-unit dorm structure that included Madison and Custis Halls on either side of it. Located right on Ball Circle across from Virginia Hall, this dormitory  possesses an elegance that is lacking in newer, purely utilitarian dorms; Ball Hall boasts a grand entrance with a large reception area,  a circular stairway extending to an amber skylight three floors above, and two fine parlors illuminated by crystal chandeliers and wall sconces. 2 Today, Ball Hall houses 105 women, second year or above, in double occupancy rooms with suite baths.3

Front View of Ball Hall

Ball Hall 2014
Alexandria Parrish, "Ball Hall 2014," March 21, 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parrish, University of Mary Washington.

 

 

Show 3 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 244.
  2. Ibid., 33.
  3. University of Mary Washington Residence Life, “Ball Hall,” University of Mary Washington, http://students.umw.edu/residencelife/ball/ (Accessed April 15, 2014).

The Bell Tower was built in 2007 from the donations of John Chappell, a friend of President William M. Anderson. Also known as the Carmen Culpeper Chappell Centennial Campanile, the tower is the tallest structure on campus, measuring 88 feet tall. The money was donated in the memory of his wife Carmen Culpeper, who was a graduate of Mary Washington. 1 A small garden is located at the base of the tower with a garden and fountain dedicated to her class, the class of 1959.2 The tower was a symbolic and sentimental project as it was constructed in the last year of President Anderson’s career at UMW. As part of the graduation procession, the class of ’07 walked out through the arches of the Bell Tower. Before the beginning of the following fall semester, the incoming freshman class walked through the arches of the structure, symbolizing new beginnings.3

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Bell Tower, 2014
Jessica Reingold, Bell Tower, February 19,2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington

Show 3 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 778-779.
  2. Ibid., 812.
  3. Ibid., 812-813.

As noted in University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008,  “in 1944 the College had purchased for $50,000 a brick residence located diagonally across from George Washington Hall.”1 The house was named Brent Hall in honor of Margaret Brent, an Englishwoman who came to America in 1638. 2 Margaret Brent eventually acquired “the site of what would become Fredericksburg.”3 From 1944 to 1947, Brent House served as the President’s home. After that it was the French language house residence hall, and then was “converted to administrative office space.”4

Today Brent House is where Emergency Management and Safety and the University Police are located.

Brent House, February 19, 2014

Brent House, February 19, 2014
Jessica Reingold, "Brent House," February 19, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

Show 4 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 56.
  2. Ibid.
  3. Ibid.
  4. Ibid.

Bushnell Hall was completed in 1959 and could house up to 144 students. It was named after Nina Bushnell, a former dean at the College. As noted in University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008, Bushnell Hall was also the “first dorm to house students from all four classes in the same building.”1

On December 5, 1980, Bushnell Hall caught on fire.2 Fortunately, none of the residents were injured, but the fourth-floor residents did need temporary alternative housing due to the damages caused by the fire.3 Bushnell was able to reopen in January for the start of the spring semester.4 The total cost of repairing the residence hall was “approximately $80,000.”5

Following the reopening, lighter incidents occurred in Bushnell Hall such as the scandalous “male strip tease shows” that took place throughout the 1980s.6 As quoted in University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 a 1984 Bullet review entitled “Bushnell Bares the Beef,” described “‘MWC’s own ‘Chippendales’ hopped about…sporting black pants, bow ties and glistening muscular chests,’” they were “egged on by cries of ‘Take it off!’”7

Today, Bushnell Hall is a co-ed suite freshman residence hall that houses 151 students. Bushnell Hall has accommodations for both double and quad occupancy rooms with suite bathrooms.8

Bushnell Hall, December 21, 1964

Bushnell Hall, December 21, 1964
"Bushnell Hall," December 21, 1964, Battlefield, 1964, UMW Archives, University of Mary Washington.

Bushnell, February 19, 2014

Bushnell, February 19, 2014
Jessica Reingold, "Bushnell," February 19, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

Front View of Bushnell, February 19, 2014

Front View of Bushnell, February 19, 2014
Jessica Reingold, "Bushnell," February 19, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

Show 8 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 82.
  2. Ibid., 274
  3. Crawley, 276
  4. Ibid., 277
  5. Ibid.
  6. Ibid., 428
  7. Ibid.
  8. University of Mary Washington Residence Life, “Bushnell Hall,” University of Mary Washington, http://students.umw.edu/residencelife/bushnell/ (Accessed April 4, 2014).

Campus Walk is a central brick walkway which runs almost the entire length of campus, starting at the Bell Tower and Double Drive in the south and ending at Goolrick Hall on the north end of campus. It passes in front of most major buildings at UMW, including George Washington, Trinkle, Lee, Monroe, and Jepson. Most residence halls are only a short distance off of Campus Walk, if not directly on it. The bricked walkway merges into Palmeri Plaza in front of Monroe and then continues down in front of the Woodard Campus Center. This covered walkway lasts until just before Simpson Library. Campus Walk continues in front of Simpson and, once construction is complete, will run through the Convergence Center and out towards Jepson. Much of what is now campus walk was originally an asphalt road, Campus Drive, which ran from College Avenue to Monroe and then back down the hill towards Sunken Road. Remnants of this road remain in what is now Double Drive on the one end, and the Sunken Road access which comes to a circle between Lee Hall and Monroe Hall. Work began in 1986, when Campus Drive was closed to through traffic and covered with the bricks it has today.1

Campus Walk Now - 2014 Resized

Students of Campus Walk, 2014
Conner Allen, "Students on Campus Walk," March 21 2014, The Personal Collection of Conner Allen, University of Mary Washington.

 

Show 1 footnote

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 368-70.

Chandler Hall was first opened for the fall 1928 school session. At that time it functioned as a mock high school used to train prospective teachers enrolled in the State Normal School. The building was originally called the Campus Training School or College Heights High. The school was discontinued in 1928 and was renamed after President Chandler, who spent years of tireless effort in support of the construction of this building.1

Chandler Hall was demolished in 2013 in order to make way for the new University Center, or Campus Center. This structure is being built in order to meet the evolving needs of students and to improve the dining facilities on campus. It will include a “campus living room,” ballroom, offices spaces for student organizations, the Multicultural Center, Center for Honor, Leadership and Service, Vice President for Student Affairs, many small and large meeting rooms, and a large dining room with ample seating. Construction is expected to be completed in time for the fall 2015 semester.2

University Center Construction, 2014

University Center Construction, 2014
Alexandria Parrish, "University Center Construction," March 21, 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parrish, University of Mary Washington.

University Center Rendering

University Center Rendering
Image is courtesy of Hanbury, Evans, Wright, and Vlattas.

Show 2 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), page 25.
  2. University of Mary Washington, “University Center,” University of Mary Washington, www.umw.edu/campuscenter/ (Accessed April 15, 2014).

Combs Hall opened in 1959 as the science building and housed the departments of Mathematics, Biology, and Chemistry. The building was named after the former president Morgan Combs who served from 1929 to 1955. By the 1990s, Combs Hall was forty years old and was extremely outdated and too small to accommodate the needs of the science department and student research. Every inch of the building was used for undergraduate research, “a process that included turning a bathroom into a lab and a storage closet into a research cubicle” according to Biology professor Rosemary Barra. 1 Thankfully, two benefactors, Robert and Alice Jepson stepped in and donated the money needed for the construction of a new science building located on the Northern end of campus. Combs was used for storage until 2002 when it was renovated and became the home for the Historic Preservation, Modern Foreign Languages, English, Linguistics, and Speech departments. The building also houses the Speaking Center, a program devoted to helping students overcome difficulties with public speaking.

Combs  Photo credit: Jessica Reingold

Combs, 2014
Jessica Reingold, "Combs", February 19, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

Show 1 footnote

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 518.
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