University of Mary Washington Then & Now

A Photography Exhibition

Posts in the 2013 category

Until the 1970s, Mary Washington had no mascot, “so when the choice of a mascot was put before the student body in 1978, Blue Tide was the winner” 1 because the swim team had used the phrase for several years. However, “in 1981, the president of the Student Association, Leath Burdeshaw, called for a change, noting that ‘many feel that the College still needs a more concrete mascot–an animal or character that can literally be at the games and put on posters and banners to help spice things up.'” 2  During the 1985-86 academic year, the student body and faculty were presented the options for the MWC mascot: the Devil-Goats, the Eagles, the Militia, the Bayonets, and the Cannons.  “The results of the poll indicated preferences for the mascot name of Eagles.” 3

Today, the University is still represented by the Eagles; however, today the UMW Eagle has a name: Sammy D. Eagle.

Students with Sammy D. Eagle, 2013 Photo courtesy of Katie Koth

UMW students with Sammy D. Eagle, 2013
Katie Koth, September 22, 2013, Mobile Uploads, Personal Collection of Katie Koth, University of Mary Washington.

Show 3 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley, Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 358
  2. Ibid., 359.
  3. Ibid., 360-361.

Devil Goat Day is UMW’s oldest tradition that still occurs today. Devil-Goat Day began in 1926 when Eileen Kramer Dodd joined the faculty and became the sponsor of the junior class.1 She and the junior class “decided to have a goat as [their] symbol.”2 One morning, all of the juniors and Dodd “appeared in the dining hall wearing white skirts and white sweatshirts decorated with a felt green goat.”3 This sparked the seniors to pick “a distinctive symbol, and they adopted a red devil as an emblem. So began the Devil-Goat rivalry.”4  Alternating classes were designated as either Devils or Goats, as events creating competition between Senior and Sophomores, and Juniors and Freshman occurred annually, which developed into Devil-Goat Day.5 However, in the 1990s students were becoming indifferent to the school’s traditions.6 In 1992, “sponsorship of the event was taken over by the freshman class officers, who tried to rejuvenate it” by adding music and more daring activities such as a climbing wall, a velcro wall, jousting and human bungees.7

The freshman must have succeeded in rejuvenating Devil-Goat Day, because the event still occurs today in 2014, and is still planned by the freshman class officers on Class Council. The tradition of having freshman and juniors versus sophomores and seniors continues as well as having the odd numbered graduation classes as Devils and even numbered graduation classes as Goats. Currently, at freshman orientation, Dean Rucker always announces to the new class of students whether they are Devils or Goats. (Dean Rucker himself is a Devil.) Devil-Goat Day continues to take place on Ball Circle, and has had a great turn out within the last few years. One newer tradition that is a part of Devil-Goat Day is trying to collect the free Devil or Goat t-shirts handed out by Class Council every year. Students will line up sometimes an hour or more before in order to make sure they can get one out of the limited supply of t-shirts. This year, in 2014, the t-shirts were handed out by Lee Hall and the Devil t-shirt line extended down campus walk towards Trinkle Hall, while the Goat t-shirt line extended down past Virginia Hall.

President Hurley on Devil Goat Day, April 25, 2013

President Hurley on Devil Goat Day, April 25, 2013
Elizabeth Henry, "President Hurley on Devil Goat Day," April 25, 2013, Personal Collection of Elizabeth Henry, University of Mary Washington.

Show 7 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 26.
  2. Ibid.
  3. Ibid.
  4. Ibid.
  5. Ibid., 27.
  6. Ibid., 719.
  7. Ibid.

Trench Hill was acquired by the College in 1947. The College remodeled it and designated it for academically talented students and later for the College’s first male students.1 Eventually it became the headquarters of the Alumni Association. In 2004, it was converted to an renamed “Kalnen Inn at Trench Hill, after the alumna benefactor Elizabeth Kalnen ’37.”2

The Jepson Alumni Executive Center is 24,000-square-feet was created by incorporating an addition to Trench Hill “to create a U-shaped, tri-unit structure.”3 The gates to the Jepson Alumni Executive Center are refurbished gates from 1900 France that were commissioned by Henry Phipps, who was a business partner of Andrew Carnegie.4

Today, the Kalnen Inn and the Jepson Executive Alumni continue as a bed-and-breakfast and as a venue available for events.

Jepson Alumni Center (formally Kalnen Inn and Trench Hill), September 22, 2013

Kalnen Inn, September 22, 2013
Jessica Reingold, "Kalnen Inn," September 22, 2013, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

Jepson Alumni Center, September 22, 2013

Jepson Alumni Executive Center, September 22, 2013
Jessica Reingold, "Jepson Alumni Executive Center," September 22, 2013, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.


Fountain at the Jepson Alumni Center, September 22, 2013

Fountain at the Jepson Alumni Executive Center, September 22, 2013
Jessica Reingold, "Fountain at the Jepson Executive Alumni Center," September 22, 2013, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

Show 4 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 57.
  2. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 547.
  3. Ibid.
  4. Ibid.

Student organizations are an active part of UMW campus life. They hold events like Holi, concerts, and fairs. They also represent the student population. The SGA, or Student Government Association, is composed of students elected by their peers. A division of the SGA is ARH, or Association of Residence Halls, which specifically focuses on issues pertaining to residence housing. ARH also hosts “Mr. UMW”, a pageant-like event with a male student representing each residence hall.

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ARH, 2013
From top left to right: Robert Sharp, Helen Bower, Ray Celeste Tanner, Sammy D. Eagle, Ethan Lane, Christie Cons, Amanda Stocker, and Rachel Howard.
From bottom left to right: Sarah Mendelsohn and Alyssa Lieurance
"Association of Residence Housing," 2013, Personal Collection of Alyssa Lieurance, University of Mary Washington.

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