University of Mary Washington Then & Now

A Photography Exhibition

Posts in the 2010s category

Then Photograph

Colony Studios, “ Monroe Hall through the trees,” n.d., The Centennial Collection, UMW Digital Archives, University of Mary Washington.

Now Photograph

Alexandria Parrish, “Monroe,” February 26, 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parrish, University of Mary Washington.

Photograph editing by Conner Allen

Then Photograph

H. Bagby, “Randolph Hall in the Fall,” n.d., H. Bagby Collection, Simpson Library Special Collections, University of Mary Washington.

Now Photograph

Jessica Reingold, “Randolph Hall,” February 19, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

Photograph editing by Jessica Reingold

Then Photograph

“Framar Pool,” 1965, The Centennial Collection, UMW Archives, University of Mary Washington.

Now Photograph

Meaghan Sullivan, “Basketball Court,” March 21, 2014, Personal Collection of Meaghan Sullivan, University of Mary Washington.

Photograph editing by Jessica Reingold 

Then Photograph

“Fine Arts Center,” 1953, The Centennial Collection, UMW Digital Archives, University of Mary Washington.

Now Photograph

Alexandria Parrish, “Dupont,” February 19 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parrish. University of Mary Washington.

Photograph editing by Conner Allen

Then Photograph

“Front View of Ball Hall,” 1987, Centennial Collection, UMW Digital Archives, University of Mary Washington.

Now Photograph

Alexandria Parrish, “Ball Hall 2014,” March 21, 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parrish, University of Mary Washington.

Photograph editing by Jessica Reingold

Emil Schnellock, a prominent artist who is featured in the “then” photo below, “came to Mary Washington in 1938 to teach art;” 1  Although an excellent professor, Schnellock’s greatest contribution to the College was the murals he and his students painted in Monroe and George Washington Halls in the 1940s. 2

Today, the Schnellock paintings are still visible in Monroe Hall and are enjoyed on a daily basis by students, faculty, and visitors.

Students Chatting in Front of the Murals in Monroe Hall, 2014 From left to right: Julia Wood, Laura-Michal Balderson, Leah Tams Carly Winfield, "Students Chatting in Monroe Hall," April 3, 2014, Personal Collection of Carly Winfield, University of Mary Washington.

Students Chatting in Front of the Murals in Monroe Hall, 2014
From left to right: Julia Wood, Laura-Michal Balderson, Leah Tams
Carly Winfield, "Students Chatting in Monroe Hall," April 3, 2014, Personal Collection of Carly Winfield, University of Mary Washington.

Show 2 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley, Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 44.
  2. Ibid., 44.

Willard, the first dorm built on campus, was named after temperance leader Frances Willard.1  This dorm was home to many campus residence firsts including first coed dorm in the fall of 1973. 2   Willard was also the first dorm to have air-conditioning when it was installed during renovations in 1980.3   Students commented on the thickness of the walls and their ability to hinder sound, and thus Willard was long considered a wilder, party dorm.4 Adding to the legacy of Willard, President Combs and his family lived in the dorm for a short while in 1928 while looking for a residence in the area. 5

 

Willard Dorm Room, 2014

Willard Dorm Room 2014
Alexandria Parrish, "Willard Dorm Room," March 26, 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parrish, University of Mary Washington.

Show 5 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 7.
  2. Ibid., 93.
  3. Ibid., 797.
  4. Ibid., 375
  5. Ibid., 29.

Virginia Hall, one of the original dorms on campus, has been home to exclusively female students throughout its existence. Over the years, this dorm has gained many demeaning nicknames relating to the nature of its inhabitants.1 Although it does not have air-conditioning, Virginia is a coveted residence for incoming freshman due to its high ceilings, large rooms, and its convenient central location.

student in dorm 2014

Student in Dorm 2014
Alexandria Parrish, "Student in Dorm 2014," February 26, 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parrish, University of Mary Washington.

Show 1 footnote

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 410.

Campus Walk is a central brick walkway which runs almost the entire length of campus, starting at the Bell Tower and Double Drive in the south and ending at Goolrick Hall on the north end of campus. It passes in front of most major buildings at UMW, including George Washington, Trinkle, Lee, Monroe, and Jepson. Most residence halls are only a short distance off of Campus Walk, if not directly on it. The bricked walkway merges into Palmeri Plaza in front of Monroe and then continues down in front of the Woodard Campus Center. This covered walkway lasts until just before Simpson Library. Campus Walk continues in front of Simpson and, once construction is complete, will run through the Convergence Center and out towards Jepson. Much of what is now campus walk was originally an asphalt road, Campus Drive, which ran from College Avenue to Monroe and then back down the hill towards Sunken Road. Remnants of this road remain in what is now Double Drive on the one end, and the Sunken Road access which comes to a circle between Lee Hall and Monroe Hall. Work began in 1986, when Campus Drive was closed to through traffic and covered with the bricks it has today.1

Campus Walk Now - 2014 Resized

Students of Campus Walk, 2014
Conner Allen, "Students on Campus Walk," March 21 2014, The Personal Collection of Conner Allen, University of Mary Washington.

 

Show 1 footnote

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 368-70.

The college’s first homecoming was a student-led event held in November of 1972. This event was designed as a parody of the “big weekends” that many of the female students attended at other universities. The theme of Mary Washington College’s first homecoming was “Bring the Boys Home,” an effort to make the girls’ dates come to their home school instead of the other way around. 1

In more recent times, Homecoming has become an event centering around school spirit. A whole weekend is dedicated to sports games, concerts, and activities. Commonly, students and alumni will gather in the parking lots at the Battlegrounds to tailgate before the games are held.

2013 Tailgate

Homecoming Tailgate 2013
"Homecoming Tailgate," October 25, 2013, University of Mary Washington Alumni Association, University of Mary Washington.

Show 1 footnote

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 161.
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