University of Mary Washington Then & Now

A Photography Exhibition

Posts in the 1980s category

Then Photograph

“Front View of Ball Hall,” 1987, Centennial Collection, UMW Digital Archives, University of Mary Washington.

Now Photograph

Alexandria Parrish, “Ball Hall 2014,” March 21, 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parrish, University of Mary Washington.

Photograph editing by Jessica Reingold

Campus Walk is a central brick walkway which runs almost the entire length of campus, starting at the Bell Tower and Double Drive in the south and ending at Goolrick Hall on the north end of campus. It passes in front of most major buildings at UMW, including George Washington, Trinkle, Lee, Monroe, and Jepson. Most residence halls are only a short distance off of Campus Walk, if not directly on it. The bricked walkway merges into Palmeri Plaza in front of Monroe and then continues down in front of the Woodard Campus Center. This covered walkway lasts until just before Simpson Library. Campus Walk continues in front of Simpson and, once construction is complete, will run through the Convergence Center and out towards Jepson. Much of what is now campus walk was originally an asphalt road, Campus Drive, which ran from College Avenue to Monroe and then back down the hill towards Sunken Road. Remnants of this road remain in what is now Double Drive on the one end, and the Sunken Road access which comes to a circle between Lee Hall and Monroe Hall. Work began in 1986, when Campus Drive was closed to through traffic and covered with the bricks it has today.1

Campus Walk Now - 2014 Resized

Students of Campus Walk, 2014
Conner Allen, "Students on Campus Walk," March 21 2014, The Personal Collection of Conner Allen, University of Mary Washington.

 

Show 1 footnote

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 368-70.

Built in 1950, Mercer Hall was the College’s infirmary.1 It continued as the campus infirmary into the 1970s, and was remodeled to include a counseling center.”2

Mercer Hall is currently under renovation. After renovation, Mercer will continue to house the Office of Judicial Affairs and the Honor Council, and will also become the home to the Psychology Department, which was “displaced by the demolition of Chandler Hall in 2013.”3 The renovation should be finished by “April 2015.”4

Mercer, March 21, 2014

Mercer, March 21, 2014
Jessica Reingold, "Mercer," March 21, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

Show 4 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 57.
  2. Ibid., 215.
  3. Lindley Estes, “More construction begins at University of Mary Washington,” (Fredericksburg, VA.) Free Lance-Star, March 22, 2014, http://news.fredericksburg.com/newsdesk/2014/03/22/more-construction-begins-on-campus/ (Accessed April 6, 2014).
  4. Ibid.

Until the 1970s, Mary Washington had no mascot, “so when the choice of a mascot was put before the student body in 1978, Blue Tide was the winner” 1 because the swim team had used the phrase for several years. However, “in 1981, the president of the Student Association, Leath Burdeshaw, called for a change, noting that ‘many feel that the College still needs a more concrete mascot–an animal or character that can literally be at the games and put on posters and banners to help spice things up.'” 2  During the 1985-86 academic year, the student body and faculty were presented the options for the MWC mascot: the Devil-Goats, the Eagles, the Militia, the Bayonets, and the Cannons.  “The results of the poll indicated preferences for the mascot name of Eagles.” 3

Today, the University is still represented by the Eagles; however, today the UMW Eagle has a name: Sammy D. Eagle.

Students with Sammy D. Eagle, 2013 Photo courtesy of Katie Koth

UMW students with Sammy D. Eagle, 2013
Katie Koth, September 22, 2013, Mobile Uploads, Personal Collection of Katie Koth, University of Mary Washington.

Show 3 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley, Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 358
  2. Ibid., 359.
  3. Ibid., 360-361.

Technology updates and changes every year. Computers, in particular, have advanced at an exponential rate since the 1980s. Physically, they are smaller, lighter, and monitors are much thinner and sleeker. Computers have also become much more powerful, faster, efficient, easy to use, and portable. Having a personal laptop at the University is almost a necessity (although there are several computer labs in various buildings for students to use) since much coursework requires access to the Internet. From typing term papers to building digital history websites, the computer has become an integral part of a college education today.

Girl Using a Touchscreen Laptop, March 24, 2014ayLifeCompNow

Girl Using a Touchscreen Laptop, March 24, 2014
Catherine LeBouton
Jessica Reingold, "Girl Using a Touchscreen Laptop," March 24, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

Communication is a central part of student life at UMW. However, keeping in contact with friends near and far has gotten considerably easier over the years. As opposed to the wall-mounted phones of the past, mobile phones allow for constant communication from virtually anywhere to practically everywhere. The introduction of smartphones only bolstered the connectivity between students and their friends, their professors, and the wider world. Staying in touch is as important as it ever was, and any stroll through campus will yield at least a handful of people talking, texting, or tweeting away.

Phone Now Resized

Student on a cell phone, 2014
Girard Bucello
Conner Allen, "Student on a cell phone," March 21 2014, The Personal Collection of Conner Allen, University of Mary Washington.

Despite the changes in technology, in sports, and in styles, there is still continuity at UMW. Trinkle Hall has changed in its organization and its uses, but is still a crucial part of campus. The rotunda, marked at the center by the seal of the school, continues to be an important landmark. The seal has been altered slightly over the years, but it nevertheless remains at the heart of Trinkle.

Inside Trinkle Now Resized

The Trinkle Insignia, 2014
Conner Allen, "The Trinkle Insignia," March 21, 2014 The Personal Collection of Conner Allen, University of Mary Washington.

E. Lee Trinkle library was originally located in Virginia Hall but was not big enough to accommodate the growing student population. The library opened in the Fall of 1941 with an addition built in 1960. It remained the college library until 1989 when a larger facility was needed. The Trinkle library could originally hold 150,000 volumes with the addition in the ’60s allowing for the storage of 250,000 volumes and an air conditioned rare books room. The library was a central part of campus before the construction of Simpson Library in 1989, as a place for students to relax and study and attend informal lectures. One such lecture was attended by the esteemed writer William Faulkner. 1 Today, a smaller library exists in Trinkle Hall and is still utilized by students.

trinkle now

Trinkle Reading Room
Meaghan Sullivan, "Trinkle Reading Room," April 15, 2014, Personal Collection of Meaghan Sullivan, University of Mary Washington


Along with the changes made in technology and communication, UMW also saw changes in automobiles and access to campus. Pictured below, students are posing in a 1918 automobile by a UMW building. Today, Campus Walk prohibits students from the same access given their 1918 predecessors. The present picture was taken outside the UMW apartments, a residence for upperclassmen.
Students Posing in an Automobile, 1918

Students Posing in an Automobile, 1918
Pictured (not in order): Mr. Harrison, Lucy Gray Richardson, S. Smith, Nannie W, Parker, Mary W. Johnson, Miss Carter.
"Students Posing in Automobile 1918," 1918, The Centennial Collection, UMW Digital Archives, University of Mary Washington

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Students in Car 2014
From right to left: Rob Jarvis, Alyssa Lieurance, Sam Johnson, Morgan Graff, Randi Bryan, and Alex Hartwig.
Meaghan Sullivan, "Students in Car 2014," April 16, 2014, Personal Collection of Meaghan Sullivan, University of Mary Washington.

Show 1 footnote

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 52-53.

Devil Goat Day is UMW’s oldest tradition that still occurs today. Devil-Goat Day began in 1926 when Eileen Kramer Dodd joined the faculty and became the sponsor of the junior class.1 She and the junior class “decided to have a goat as [their] symbol.”2 One morning, all of the juniors and Dodd “appeared in the dining hall wearing white skirts and white sweatshirts decorated with a felt green goat.”3 This sparked the seniors to pick “a distinctive symbol, and they adopted a red devil as an emblem. So began the Devil-Goat rivalry.”4  Alternating classes were designated as either Devils or Goats, as events creating competition between Senior and Sophomores, and Juniors and Freshman occurred annually, which developed into Devil-Goat Day.5 However, in the 1990s students were becoming indifferent to the school’s traditions.6 In 1992, “sponsorship of the event was taken over by the freshman class officers, who tried to rejuvenate it” by adding music and more daring activities such as a climbing wall, a velcro wall, jousting and human bungees.7

The freshman must have succeeded in rejuvenating Devil-Goat Day, because the event still occurs today in 2014, and is still planned by the freshman class officers on Class Council. The tradition of having freshman and juniors versus sophomores and seniors continues as well as having the odd numbered graduation classes as Devils and even numbered graduation classes as Goats. Currently, at freshman orientation, Dean Rucker always announces to the new class of students whether they are Devils or Goats. (Dean Rucker himself is a Devil.) Devil-Goat Day continues to take place on Ball Circle, and has had a great turn out within the last few years. One newer tradition that is a part of Devil-Goat Day is trying to collect the free Devil or Goat t-shirts handed out by Class Council every year. Students will line up sometimes an hour or more before in order to make sure they can get one out of the limited supply of t-shirts. This year, in 2014, the t-shirts were handed out by Lee Hall and the Devil t-shirt line extended down campus walk towards Trinkle Hall, while the Goat t-shirt line extended down past Virginia Hall.

President Hurley on Devil Goat Day, April 25, 2013

President Hurley on Devil Goat Day, April 25, 2013
Elizabeth Henry, "President Hurley on Devil Goat Day," April 25, 2013, Personal Collection of Elizabeth Henry, University of Mary Washington.

Show 7 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 26.
  2. Ibid.
  3. Ibid.
  4. Ibid.
  5. Ibid., 27.
  6. Ibid., 719.
  7. Ibid.

Woodard Campus Center was opened in 1987, named in honor of Prince Briggs Woodard, President of the University from 1974 to 1982. Woodard sits in the depression “roughly between Willard and Melchers,” which was a difficult site for construction. However, it provided the opportunity to expand Campus Walk and link the main body of the school with Goolrick Hall and the northern end of campus. The upper floor features the Great Hall, an open space used for special events which featured mobile partitions to create temporary meeting spaces.1 Woodard is currently home to the Eagle’s Nest dining facilities, the University Post Office, and UMW’s radio station. The Great Hall and UMW Commuters’ Lounge are now inaccessible as much of the building is now under renovation. When construction is complete, Woodard will housed the College of Business.2

Woodard Campus Center, 2014

Woodard, 2014
Alexandria Parrish, “Woodard,” February 19 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parrish. University of Mary Washington.

Show 2 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 370-72.
  2. Lindley Estes, “More construction begins at University of Mary Washington,” (Fredericksburg, VA.) Free Lance-Star, March 22, 2014, http://news.fredericksburg.com/newsdesk/2014/03/22/more-construction-begins-on-campus/(Accessed April 28, 2014).

In 1941, the E. Lee Trinkle Library opened and “remained the College library for a half of century, until the expanding collection necessitated larger quarters in 1989.” 1  According to Dr. Crawley’s University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008, “Pride in the beautiful new building was such that students and faculty immediately adopted the practice of scrupulously not stepping on the College seal on the rotunda floor.” 2  While that tradition has faded, today’s students still treasure the building.  Today Trinkle Hall is home to the Mathematics, Religion, Philosophy, Computer Science, and Classics departments, as well as the College of Education.

Trinkle Now

Trinkle Hall, 2014
Jessica Reingold, "Trinkle Hall," February 19, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

Show 2 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley, Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 53.
  2. Ibid., 53.

Simpson Library opened at the start of the Spring 1989 semester, named in honor of former university president Grellet C. Simpson. This building was constructed in the late 1980s as a replacement for Trinkle Library, which was heavily over capacity by that point. Originally designed to house about 100,000 books, its collection had swelled to about 300,000 by the 1980s. Situated along Campus Walk, Simpson has a number of features, including a climate-controlled archive room, offices,classrooms and meeting areas, as well as various scanning, printing, and computer stations. Yet the main asset is “nine miles of shelving capable of holding over a half-million items.”1 Several important groups are housed in the library, including the Special Collections archives and the ThinkLab, which features at 3D printer.

Construction of the Information and Technology Convergence Center started in June 2012. The ITCC is slated to open in the Fall of 2014, and will be joined onto the library, crossing over Campus Walk. According to the Office of the Provost, “The main floor of the building will have a walk up ‘e-station bar’ where users can quickly check e-mails or other communications.  Group collaboration spaces, designed to incorporate digital collaboration software and equipment, are also a part of the proposed building.  A multi-media editing studio will enable users ready access to computers with video editing and other similar software necessary for doing sophisticated digital productions.  The building will also include a small video production studio.”2 Furthermore, the Speaking and Writing Centers are planned to relocate to the Convergence Center.3

Simpson Now Resized

Simpson Library, 2014
Alexandria Parrish, "Simpson Library," March 21 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parrish. University of Mary Washington.


Convergence Center Now Resized

Convergence Center Construction, 2014
Alexandria Parish, "Convergence Center Construction," March 21 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parish. University of Mary Washington.

Convergence Center rendering

Rendering of completed Convergence Center
Courtesy of Hanbury, Evans, Wright, and Vlattas.

Show 3 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 372-75.
  2. University of Mary Washington Office of the Provost, “Convergence Center,” University of Mary Washington, http://provost.umw.edu/convergence-center/ (Accessed April 16, 2014).
  3. University of Mary Washington Media and Public Relations, “UMW Celebrates Construction of Convergence Center,” University of Mary Washington, http://www.umw.edu/news/2012/09/20/umw-celebrates-construction-of-technology-convergence-center/ (Accessed April 18, 2014).

South Hall is a small co-ed first-year residence building located on the south end of campus behind Jefferson Hall and alongside Framar House. It houses 32 students and was completed in August of 1988. 1. In the late 1990s, the dormitory was the unofficial home to the Psi Upsilon fraternity brothers and in 2006, was one of the only four air-conditioned buildings on campus. 2

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South Hall, 1980-1989
"South Hall," 1980-1989, UMW Archives, University of Mary Washington

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South Hall, 2014
Jessica Reingold, "South Hall," February 19,2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington

Show 2 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008),375
  2. Ibid., 683.
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