University of Mary Washington Then & Now

A Photography Exhibition

Posts in the 1940s category

Trench Hill was acquired by the College in 1947. The College remodeled it and designated it for academically talented students and later for the College’s first male students.1 Eventually it became the headquarters of the Alumni Association. In 2004, it was converted to an renamed “Kalnen Inn at Trench Hill, after the alumna benefactor Elizabeth Kalnen ’37.”2

The Jepson Alumni Executive Center is 24,000-square-feet was created by incorporating an addition to Trench Hill “to create a U-shaped, tri-unit structure.”3 The gates to the Jepson Alumni Executive Center are refurbished gates from 1900 France that were commissioned by Henry Phipps, who was a business partner of Andrew Carnegie.4

Today, the Kalnen Inn and the Jepson Executive Alumni continue as a bed-and-breakfast and as a venue available for events.

Jepson Alumni Center (formally Kalnen Inn and Trench Hill), September 22, 2013

Kalnen Inn, September 22, 2013
Jessica Reingold, "Kalnen Inn," September 22, 2013, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

Jepson Alumni Center, September 22, 2013

Jepson Alumni Executive Center, September 22, 2013
Jessica Reingold, "Jepson Alumni Executive Center," September 22, 2013, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.


Fountain at the Jepson Alumni Center, September 22, 2013

Fountain at the Jepson Alumni Executive Center, September 22, 2013
Jessica Reingold, "Fountain at the Jepson Executive Alumni Center," September 22, 2013, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

Show 4 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 57.
  2. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 547.
  3. Ibid.
  4. Ibid.

The Framar pool was a part of the original purchase of Framar house from Dr. and Mrs. Frank Reichel in 1946. Adjacent to the pool was a picnic area where students could grill and eat outside. The pool was a popular hangout for students and was a great place to tan on summer days. 1  Today, the area is home to an outdoor basketball court. The picnic area still stands but is not as popular as it was in the past and is no longer home to grilling or summer activities.

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Framar pool, March 21, 2014
Meaghan Sullivan, "Basketball Court," March 21, 2014, Personal Collection of Meaghan Sullivan, University of Mary Washington.

Show 1 footnote

  1. Wiliam B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 56.

As noted in University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008,  “in 1944 the College had purchased for $50,000 a brick residence located diagonally across from George Washington Hall.”1 The house was named Brent Hall in honor of Margaret Brent, an Englishwoman who came to America in 1638. 2 Margaret Brent eventually acquired “the site of what would become Fredericksburg.”3 From 1944 to 1947, Brent House served as the President’s home. After that it was the French language house residence hall, and then was “converted to administrative office space.”4

Today Brent House is where Emergency Management and Safety and the University Police are located.

Brent House, February 19, 2014

Brent House, February 19, 2014
Jessica Reingold, "Brent House," February 19, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

Show 4 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 56.
  2. Ibid.
  3. Ibid.
  4. Ibid.

In 1941, the E. Lee Trinkle Library opened and “remained the College library for a half of century, until the expanding collection necessitated larger quarters in 1989.” 1  According to Dr. Crawley’s University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008, “Pride in the beautiful new building was such that students and faculty immediately adopted the practice of scrupulously not stepping on the College seal on the rotunda floor.” 2  While that tradition has faded, today’s students still treasure the building.  Today Trinkle Hall is home to the Mathematics, Religion, Philosophy, Computer Science, and Classics departments, as well as the College of Education.

Trinkle Now

Trinkle Hall, 2014
Jessica Reingold, "Trinkle Hall," February 19, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

Show 2 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley, Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 53.
  2. Ibid., 53.

UMW purchased Framar House in 1946 from Dr. Frank H. Reichel and his wife Marion. The name of the building is a combination of Frank (Fra) and Marion (mar). The house was originally used as the president’s house until Brompton House replaced it in 1948, and thereafter was used as a dormitory residence. The original purchase from Dr. and Mrs. Reichel included the brick residence, a five-room guesthouse and garage, a swimming pool and picnic area, and a rose and boxwood garden as part of a seven and a half acre tract. The purchase was a vital addition to the school as it made the campus a contiguous unit. The house was mostly known as the “Spanish house” or “leadership house”. 1 In the late 1950s, Framar was one of the first dorms to partake in the volunteer, non credit seminars initiated by students and organized by philosophy professor George Von Sant. These seminars quickly became popular and many other residence buildings followed suit.  Today, Framar is the home of the International Living Center (ILC) and holds 21 students. 2

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Framar House, 2014
Jessica Reingold, "Framar House," February 19, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington

Show 2 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 56.
  2. Ibid., 533.

Chandler Hall was first opened for the fall 1928 school session. At that time it functioned as a mock high school used to train prospective teachers enrolled in the State Normal School. The building was originally called the Campus Training School or College Heights High. The school was discontinued in 1928 and was renamed after President Chandler, who spent years of tireless effort in support of the construction of this building.1

Chandler Hall was demolished in 2013 in order to make way for the new University Center, or Campus Center. This structure is being built in order to meet the evolving needs of students and to improve the dining facilities on campus. It will include a “campus living room,” ballroom, offices spaces for student organizations, the Multicultural Center, Center for Honor, Leadership and Service, Vice President for Student Affairs, many small and large meeting rooms, and a large dining room with ample seating. Construction is expected to be completed in time for the fall 2015 semester.2

University Center Construction, 2014

University Center Construction, 2014
Alexandria Parrish, "University Center Construction," March 21, 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parrish, University of Mary Washington.

University Center Rendering

University Center Rendering
Image is courtesy of Hanbury, Evans, Wright, and Vlattas.

Show 2 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), page 25.
  2. University of Mary Washington, “University Center,” University of Mary Washington, www.umw.edu/campuscenter/ (Accessed April 15, 2014).
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