University of Mary Washington Then & Now

A Photography Exhibition

Posts in the Residence Buildings category

Mason Hall, and its sister dorm, Randolph, was constructed during a five-year building boom that began in 1950, and it was completed in 1957. 1  It was named for Ann Thomas Mason, mother of George Mason, author of the Virginia Bill of Rights. It recently underwent renovations and was reopened in Fall 2012 as an upperclassmen residence hall. 2 

Mason Hall Then

Mason Hall, 1954
"Mason Hall completed," 1954, Simpson Library Special Collections, University of Mary Washington.

Mason Now

Mason Hall, 2014
Carly Winfield, "Mason Hall," March 21, 2014, Personal Collection of Carly Winfield, University of Mary Washington.

Show 2 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley, Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 57.
  2. University of Mary Washington Residence Life, “Mason Hall,” University of Mary Washington, http://students.umw.edu/residencelife/mason/(Accessed April 21, 2014).

Randolph Hall, and its sister dorm, Mason, was constructed during a five-year building boom that began in 1950, and it was completed in 1954. 1  It was named for Martha Jefferson Randolph, daughter of President Thomas Jefferson. It recently underwent renovations and was reopened in Fall 2012 as a freshmen residence hall. 2

Randolph Hall, year needed citation

Randolph Hall, n.d.
H. Bagby, "Randolph Hall in the Fall," n.d., H. Bagby Collection, Simpson Library Special Collections, University of Mary Washington.

Randolph Hall, 2014 Photo courtesy of Jessica Reigngold

Randolph Hall, 2014
Jessica Reingold, "Randolph Hall," February 19, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

Show 2 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley, Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 57.
  2. University of Mary Washington Residence Life, “Randolph Hall,” University of Mary Washington, http://students.umw.edu/residencelife/randoph, (Accessed April 21, 2014).

In 1965, a new dormitory was built on Sunken Road and named “Russell” in honor of the College’s former President Russell.1 Continuing through 1977, Russell Hall was an Upperclassmen residence hall. As quoted in University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008, both Russell and Jefferson halls acquired a personality described in the 1977 Bullet as, “Household words at UVa, U. of R., and Randy Mac. The ladies there are the darlings of the preps, and on most Friday and Saturday nights their dorm is the scene of more passes than a school of quarterbacks.”2

Today, Russell Hall is a co-ed, freshman residence hall that houses approximately 173 students.3 Russell Hall is a split-level building with double and triple rooms, and hall bathrooms.4

Russell Hall

Russell Hall
Judson Smith Studio, "Russell Hall," n.d., UMW Archives, University of Mary Washington.

Russell, February 19, 2014

Russell, February 19, 2014
Jessica Reingold, "Russell," February 19, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

Show 4 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 19.
  2. Ibid., 244.
  3. University of Mary Washington Residence Life, “Russell Hall,” University of Mary Washington, http://students.umw.edu/residencelife/russell/ ( Accessed April 4, 2014).
  4. Ibid.

South Hall is a small co-ed first-year residence building located on the south end of campus behind Jefferson Hall and alongside Framar House. It houses 32 students and was completed in August of 1988. 1. In the late 1990s, the dormitory was the unofficial home to the Psi Upsilon fraternity brothers and in 2006, was one of the only four air-conditioned buildings on campus. 2

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South Hall, 1980-1989
"South Hall," 1980-1989, UMW Archives, University of Mary Washington

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South Hall, 2014
Jessica Reingold, "South Hall," February 19,2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington

Show 2 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008),375
  2. Ibid., 683.

The UMW Apartments on William Street used to be a privately owned apartment complex before the University bought them. The apartments are for upperclassmen that have 60 or more credits. “They provide the opportunity for 350 junior and senior students to experience apartment-style living while enjoying all of the amenities of on-campus living.”1 The one-bedroom apartments house two individuals; the two-bedroom apartments house three individuals, and the three-bedroom apartments house four individuals.2

Apartments at UMW, November 5, 2003

Apartments at UMW, November 5, 2003
Lou Cordero, "Apartments at UMW," November 5, 2003, UMW Archives, University of Mary Washington.

UMW Apartments, February 23, 2014

UMW Apartments, February 23, 2014
Jessica Reingold, "UMW Apartments," February 23, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

 

 

Show 2 footnotes

  1. University of Mary Washington Residence Life, “UMW Apartments,” University of Mary Washington, http://students.umw.edu/residencelife/umwapartments/ (Accessed April 4, 2014).
  2. Ibid.

Virginia Hall, named after the Commonwealth of Virginia, was constructed in 1915 and is the second oldest residence hall on the campus.1 The building was an integral part of the “Daisy Chain” tradition. A chain consisting of thousands of daisies was carried on the shoulders of two-year diploma graduates during Class Day ceremonies. Virginia Hall served as the ultimate resting place for the chain, where it was to remain throughout the graduation ceremonies. This tradition continued through 1942, after which date the school stopped awarding two-year diplomas.2

Additional wings were added to the building in two stages, giving the dormitory the H shape seen today.3 Virginia houses approximately 183 female students of all  different classes.4

 

Virginia Hall

Virginia Hall 2014
Alexandria Parrish, "Virginia Hall 2014," February 19, 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parrish, University of Mary Washington.

Show 4 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), page 10.
  2. Ibid., 38.
  3. Ibid., 32.
  4. University of Mary Washington Residence Life, “Virginia Hall,” University of Mary Washington, http://students.umw.edu/residencelife/virginia/ (Accessed April 15, 2014).

Virginia Hall, one of the original dorms on campus, has been home to exclusively female students throughout its existence. Over the years, this dorm has gained many demeaning nicknames relating to the nature of its inhabitants.1 Although it does not have air-conditioning, Virginia is a coveted residence for incoming freshman due to its high ceilings, large rooms, and its convenient central location.

student in dorm 2014

Student in Dorm 2014
Alexandria Parrish, "Student in Dorm 2014," February 26, 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parrish, University of Mary Washington.

Show 1 footnote

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 410.

Westmoreland Hall was completed and ready for students in 1939. 1   The residence is located next to George Washington Hall, the administrative hub of campus and across from Randolph and Mason residence halls. With the addition of male students to the University in the early 1970s, Westmoreland served as home to some of the overflow of males in need of housing. In the fall of 1975, it was turned into a coed dorm. 2 After this proved a success, the first coed dorm, Willard Hall, was established. Today, the building houses 111 upper-class students. 3

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Westmoreland Hall
"Westmoreland Hall," n.d., UMW Digital Archives, University of Mary Washington

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Westmoreland Hall, 2014
Alexandria Parrish, "Westmoreland Hall," March 21, 2014, Personal collection of Alexandria Parrish, University of Mary Washington

Show 3 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 43.
  2. Ibid., 239.
  3. University of Mary Washington Residence Life, “Westmoreland Hall,” http://students.umw.edu/residencelife/westmoreland/ (Accessed April 21, 2014).

Willard Hall was the school’s first residence hall and one of the first two buildings erected on campus. Originally called “The Dormitory,” it was named in honor of Frances Willard, a leader in the temperance movement. Constructed in 1911, Willard is known for its large rooms. 1 Willard was the first coed dorm on campus, when seven male students were moved in during the 1973-1974 term.2 With an important renovation in 1980, Willard was also the first dorm to have air conditioning. The residence hall was given a more modern look over the course of the renovations, along with important structural updates.3 The dormitory underwent renovations again in 2006, to maintain the building after almost one hundred years of use.4 It continues to be a coed dorm today, primarily housing upperclassmen.

Willard Then Resized 2

Willard Hall, n.d.
"Willard Hall," n.d., UMW Archives, University of Mary Washington.

Willard Now Resized 2

Willard, 2014
Alexandria Parrish, “Willard,” February 19 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parrish. University of Mary Washington.

Show 4 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 6-9,
  2. Ibid., 93.
  3. Ibid., 216-17.
  4. Ibid., 797.

Willard, the first dorm built on campus, was named after temperance leader Frances Willard.1  This dorm was home to many campus residence firsts including first coed dorm in the fall of 1973. 2   Willard was also the first dorm to have air-conditioning when it was installed during renovations in 1980.3   Students commented on the thickness of the walls and their ability to hinder sound, and thus Willard was long considered a wilder, party dorm.4 Adding to the legacy of Willard, President Combs and his family lived in the dorm for a short while in 1928 while looking for a residence in the area. 5

 

Willard Dorm Room, 2014

Willard Dorm Room 2014
Alexandria Parrish, "Willard Dorm Room," March 26, 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parrish, University of Mary Washington.

Show 5 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 7.
  2. Ibid., 93.
  3. Ibid., 797.
  4. Ibid., 375
  5. Ibid., 29.
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