University of Mary Washington Then & Now

A Photography Exhibition

Posts in the Structural category

Madison Hall was completed in 1935 and is named for Dolly Payne Madison, wife of James Madison.1 It is one of three buildings that collectively comprise the Tri-Unit, along with Ball and Custis Halls. Centrally located, Madison is a co-ed, upper-class residence that houses 41 students and is home to the Gender Neutral Housing Community. 2

Madison Hall, 2014

Madison Hall 2014
Alexandria Parrish, "Madison Hall," March 21, 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parrish, University of Mary Washington.

Show 2 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), page 33.
  2. University of Mary Washington Residence Life, “Madison Hall,” University of Mary Washington, http://students.umw.edu/residencelife/madison/ (Accessed April 15, 2014).

Marshall Hall was built in 1960 and is a 144 bed residence hall. The building was named in honor of Mary Willis Ambler Marshall, wife of the esteemed Chief Justice John Marshall. Located at the bottom of “Marshall Hill”, below Russell Hall, Framar House, and South Hall, it is considered one of the more secluded dorms on campus. 1

Marshall then

Marshall Hall
"Marshall Hall," n.d., UMW Archives, University of Mary Washington

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Marshall Hall, 2014
Jessica Reingold, "Marshall Hall," February 19, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington

Show 1 footnote

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 82.

Originally named Ridge Crest, Marye House was constructed in the 1910s as the President’s residence, but over the years its purpose has varied.  It has been used as a student residence hall, the Spanish house1, and is used today as the Office of Residence Life and Commuter Student Services, Judicial Affairs and Community Responsibility, and the Dean of Student Life.

Marye House Now

Marye House, 2014
Carly Winfield, "Marye House," March 21, 2014, Personal Collection of Carly Winfield, University of Mary Washington.

Show 1 footnote

  1. William B. Crawley, Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 11.

Mason Hall, and its sister dorm, Randolph, was constructed during a five-year building boom that began in 1950, and it was completed in 1957. 1  It was named for Ann Thomas Mason, mother of George Mason, author of the Virginia Bill of Rights. It recently underwent renovations and was reopened in Fall 2012 as an upperclassmen residence hall. 2 

Mason Hall Then

Mason Hall, 1954
"Mason Hall completed," 1954, Simpson Library Special Collections, University of Mary Washington.

Mason Now

Mason Hall, 2014
Carly Winfield, "Mason Hall," March 21, 2014, Personal Collection of Carly Winfield, University of Mary Washington.

Show 2 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley, Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 57.
  2. University of Mary Washington Residence Life, “Mason Hall,” University of Mary Washington, http://students.umw.edu/residencelife/mason/(Accessed April 21, 2014).

Built in 1950, Mercer Hall was the College’s infirmary.1 It continued as the campus infirmary into the 1970s, and was remodeled to include a counseling center.”2

Mercer Hall is currently under renovation. After renovation, Mercer will continue to house the Office of Judicial Affairs and the Honor Council, and will also become the home to the Psychology Department, which was “displaced by the demolition of Chandler Hall in 2013.”3 The renovation should be finished by “April 2015.”4

Mercer, March 21, 2014

Mercer, March 21, 2014
Jessica Reingold, "Mercer," March 21, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

Show 4 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 57.
  2. Ibid., 215.
  3. Lindley Estes, “More construction begins at University of Mary Washington,” (Fredericksburg, VA.) Free Lance-Star, March 22, 2014, http://news.fredericksburg.com/newsdesk/2014/03/22/more-construction-begins-on-campus/ (Accessed April 6, 2014).
  4. Ibid.

Monroe Hall was founded in 1911.  It was one of three original buildings built for the State Normal and Industrial School for Women, the first incarnation of the University of Mary Washington. The building currently functions as an academic building, and houses the History, Geography, Political Science and International Affiars, Sociology, and Anthropology Departments.  Notably, murals by retired faculty member Emil Schnellock adorn the building’s walls on the second floor. 1  Monroe has been renovated multiple times, and was most recently reopened for the 2011-2012 academic year. 2

Directly in front of Monroe today lies what students commonly refer to as the “Monroe Fountain.” The brick area around the fountain which connects Monroe Hall with Virginia Hall and Willard Hall was named Palmieri Plaza in honor of Richard Palmeri. Richard was a greatly esteemed Geography professor at the school who succumbed to cancer in 1997.3 The area is a central part of campus and is one of the most traveled places at the university.

 

Monroe, 2014

Monroe, 2014
Alexandria Parrish, "Monroe," February 26, 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parrish, University of Mary Washington.

Show 3 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), page 44.
  2. Ibid., 216.
  3. Ibid., 604-606.

Randolph Hall, and its sister dorm, Mason, was constructed during a five-year building boom that began in 1950, and it was completed in 1954. 1  It was named for Martha Jefferson Randolph, daughter of President Thomas Jefferson. It recently underwent renovations and was reopened in Fall 2012 as a freshmen residence hall. 2

Randolph Hall, year needed citation

Randolph Hall, n.d.
H. Bagby, "Randolph Hall in the Fall," n.d., H. Bagby Collection, Simpson Library Special Collections, University of Mary Washington.

Randolph Hall, 2014 Photo courtesy of Jessica Reigngold

Randolph Hall, 2014
Jessica Reingold, "Randolph Hall," February 19, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

Show 2 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley, Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 57.
  2. University of Mary Washington Residence Life, “Randolph Hall,” University of Mary Washington, http://students.umw.edu/residencelife/randoph, (Accessed April 21, 2014).

In 1965, a new dormitory was built on Sunken Road and named “Russell” in honor of the College’s former President Russell.1 Continuing through 1977, Russell Hall was an Upperclassmen residence hall. As quoted in University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008, both Russell and Jefferson halls acquired a personality described in the 1977 Bullet as, “Household words at UVa, U. of R., and Randy Mac. The ladies there are the darlings of the preps, and on most Friday and Saturday nights their dorm is the scene of more passes than a school of quarterbacks.”2

Today, Russell Hall is a co-ed, freshman residence hall that houses approximately 173 students.3 Russell Hall is a split-level building with double and triple rooms, and hall bathrooms.4

Russell Hall

Russell Hall
Judson Smith Studio, "Russell Hall," n.d., UMW Archives, University of Mary Washington.

Russell, February 19, 2014

Russell, February 19, 2014
Jessica Reingold, "Russell," February 19, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

Show 4 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 19.
  2. Ibid., 244.
  3. University of Mary Washington Residence Life, “Russell Hall,” University of Mary Washington, http://students.umw.edu/residencelife/russell/ ( Accessed April 4, 2014).
  4. Ibid.

“In June 1930 Governor John Garland Pollard authorized the construction of the new kitchen and dining hall” 1  with living quarters in the basement for the Home Economics Department, and in spring 1931 the new dining hall was opened for occupancy. 2

Today, Seacobeck Hall is still the primary dining hall, and  it now offers three dining rooms for students with their own unique cuisine and décor: The Washington Diner, The Smart Market, and the UMW Bistro.  The Historic Dining Room at Seacobeck is used Monday-Friday for UMW faculty, staff, and their guests.3

Seacobeck Now

Seacobeck Hall, 2014
Alexandra Parrish, "Seacobeck Hall," March 21, 2014, Personal collection of Alexandria Parrish, University of Mary Washington.

Show 3 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley, Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 31.
  2. Ibid., 31
  3. University of Mary Washington Dining, “The Restaurants at Seacobeck,” University of Mary Washington,http://www.umwdining.com/locations/index.html (Accessed April 6, 2014).

Simpson Library opened at the start of the Spring 1989 semester, named in honor of former university president Grellet C. Simpson. This building was constructed in the late 1980s as a replacement for Trinkle Library, which was heavily over capacity by that point. Originally designed to house about 100,000 books, its collection had swelled to about 300,000 by the 1980s. Situated along Campus Walk, Simpson has a number of features, including a climate-controlled archive room, offices,classrooms and meeting areas, as well as various scanning, printing, and computer stations. Yet the main asset is “nine miles of shelving capable of holding over a half-million items.”1 Several important groups are housed in the library, including the Special Collections archives and the ThinkLab, which features at 3D printer.

Construction of the Information and Technology Convergence Center started in June 2012. The ITCC is slated to open in the Fall of 2014, and will be joined onto the library, crossing over Campus Walk. According to the Office of the Provost, “The main floor of the building will have a walk up ‘e-station bar’ where users can quickly check e-mails or other communications.  Group collaboration spaces, designed to incorporate digital collaboration software and equipment, are also a part of the proposed building.  A multi-media editing studio will enable users ready access to computers with video editing and other similar software necessary for doing sophisticated digital productions.  The building will also include a small video production studio.”2 Furthermore, the Speaking and Writing Centers are planned to relocate to the Convergence Center.3

Simpson Now Resized

Simpson Library, 2014
Alexandria Parrish, "Simpson Library," March 21 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parrish. University of Mary Washington.


Convergence Center Now Resized

Convergence Center Construction, 2014
Alexandria Parish, "Convergence Center Construction," March 21 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parish. University of Mary Washington.

Convergence Center rendering

Rendering of completed Convergence Center
Courtesy of Hanbury, Evans, Wright, and Vlattas.

Show 3 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 372-75.
  2. University of Mary Washington Office of the Provost, “Convergence Center,” University of Mary Washington, http://provost.umw.edu/convergence-center/ (Accessed April 16, 2014).
  3. University of Mary Washington Media and Public Relations, “UMW Celebrates Construction of Convergence Center,” University of Mary Washington, http://www.umw.edu/news/2012/09/20/umw-celebrates-construction-of-technology-convergence-center/ (Accessed April 18, 2014).
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