University of Mary Washington Then & Now

A Photography Exhibition

Posts in the Structural category

Completed in 1935 as part of a tri-unit dorm facility along with Ball and Madison Halls, Custis Hall was named after Mary Anne Randolf Custis Lee, the wife of general Robert E. Lee.1 Today it houses 42 upperclass men and women. 2

Custis Hall

Custis Hall 1966
"Custis Hall," July 21, 1966, UMW Digital Archives, University of Mary Washington.

Custis Now

Custis Hall 2014
Alexandria Parrish, "Custis Hall," February 19, 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parrish, University of Mary Washington.

 

Show 2 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), page 33.
  2. University of Mary Washington Residence Life, “Custis Hall,” University of Mary Washington, http://students.umw.edu/residencelife/custis/(Accessed April 15, 2014).

The Fine Arts Center was built in the 1950s, during a wave of new construction across campus.1 The trio of buildings consists of DuPont, Melchers, and Pollard, which now house the departments of art, art history, music, and theatre & dance. DuPont is named in honor of Jessie Ball duPont, a prominent philanthropist.2 Melchers is named in honor of Julius Garibaldi “Gari” Melchers, an internationally-acclaimed painter who moved to Fredericksburg in his later years. After his death, his wife, Corinne, became a prominent benefactor of the arts.3 Pollard is named in honor of John Garland Pollard, Governor of Virginia during the Great Depression. While the dire economic conditions of the era limited the aid he could give to the school, he did help with the authorizing of resources for construction projects on campus, notably those for Seacobeck Hall.4   At the center of DuPont Hall is Klein Theatre, named for instructor of dramatic arts Albert R. Klein. He was a member of the theatre faculty from 1952 until his death in 1970; the following year the theatre was renamed in his honor.5 The Fine Arts Center was renovated in the mid-1990s, updating the facilities which had originally been built in the 1950s, including the addition of a computer lab in Melchers.6

Dupont Now Resized

Dupont, 2014
Alexandria Parrish, “Dupont,” February 19 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parrish. University of Mary Washington.

Fine Arts Center Now Resized

Melchers, 2014
Alexandria Parrish, “Melchers,” February 19 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parish. University of Mary Washington.

Show 6 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 57.
  2. Jessie Ball duPont Fund: About Us, “Our History,” Jessie Ball duPont Fund, http://www.dupontfund.org/about/history/(Accessed April 18, 2014).
  3. Crawley, 226-27.
  4. Ibid., 31.
  5. University of Mary Washington Theatre & Dance, “Klein Theatre,” University of Mary Washington, http://cas.umw.edu/theatre/online-tour/klein-theatre/(Accessed April 17, 2014).
  6. Crawley, 572-74.

UMW purchased Framar House in 1946 from Dr. Frank H. Reichel and his wife Marion. The name of the building is a combination of Frank (Fra) and Marion (mar). The house was originally used as the president’s house until Brompton House replaced it in 1948, and thereafter was used as a dormitory residence. The original purchase from Dr. and Mrs. Reichel included the brick residence, a five-room guesthouse and garage, a swimming pool and picnic area, and a rose and boxwood garden as part of a seven and a half acre tract. The purchase was a vital addition to the school as it made the campus a contiguous unit. The house was mostly known as the “Spanish house” or “leadership house”. 1 In the late 1950s, Framar was one of the first dorms to partake in the volunteer, non credit seminars initiated by students and organized by philosophy professor George Von Sant. These seminars quickly became popular and many other residence buildings followed suit.  Today, Framar is the home of the International Living Center (ILC) and holds 21 students. 2

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Framar House, 2014
Jessica Reingold, "Framar House," February 19, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington

Show 2 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 56.
  2. Ibid., 533.

The Framar pool was a part of the original purchase of Framar house from Dr. and Mrs. Frank Reichel in 1946. Adjacent to the pool was a picnic area where students could grill and eat outside. The pool was a popular hangout for students and was a great place to tan on summer days. 1  Today, the area is home to an outdoor basketball court. The picnic area still stands but is not as popular as it was in the past and is no longer home to grilling or summer activities.

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Framar pool, March 21, 2014
Meaghan Sullivan, "Basketball Court," March 21, 2014, Personal Collection of Meaghan Sullivan, University of Mary Washington.

Show 1 footnote

  1. Wiliam B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 56.

Construction on George Washington Hall (also known as GW Hall) began in 1938 and was completed the following year.1 The building was established to answer the need for classrooms and administrative space necessary to serve the growing student population. The building also contained an auditorium capable of seating 1,624 people and included a stage with dressing rooms located below. 2 In 1980, the auditorium was named Eileen Kramer Dodd Auditorium in honor of a former professor who retired after forty four years at the College.3 Located below the auditorium was a mirrored ballroom known as the “Hall of Mirrors” used for events and formal dances. The roof of George Washington Hall contained a roof garden used for special events but also as a recreational area for students to relax and eat. Today, GW is the home of administrative offices, including the office of the president. Neither the roof garden nor the Hall of Mirrors are present today, however, Dodd Auditorium is still a central part of student life. The auditorium holds formal events, performance art shows, and “Cheap Seats” a program that shows popular movies for students for only a dollar admission.

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George Washington Hall, 2014
Meaghan Sullivan, "George Washington Hall," March 21, 2014, Personal collection of Meaghan Sullivan, University of Mary Washington

Show 3 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008),43
  2. Ibid.
  3. Ibid.,44.

Jefferson Hall opened in 1967, could house 195 students, and was named for Thomas Jefferson.1 The residence hall included several innovative features such as “the campus’s first dorm elevator, a cluster arrangement of rooms that included kitchenettes, and a number of single rooms for students who desired privacy.”2 Continuing through 1977, Jefferson Hall was an upperclassmen residence hall. As quoted in University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008, both Jefferson and Russell halls acquired a personality described in the 1977 Bullet as, “Household words at UVa, U. of R., and Randy Mac. The ladies there are the darlings of the preps, and on most Friday and Saturday nights their dorm is the scene of more passes than a school of quarterbacks.”3

Jefferson Hall today is a co-ed, freshman residence hall that houses approximately 192 students. The residence hall has both double and triple rooms with hall bathrooms.4

Jefferson Hall, n.d.

Jefferson Hall, n.d.
"Jefferson Hall," n.d., UMW Archives, University of Mary Washington.

Jefferson, February 19, 2014

Jefferson, February 19, 2014
Jessica Reingold, "Jefferson," February 19, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

Show 4 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 82.
  2. Ibid.
  3. Ibid., 244.
  4. University of Mary Washington Residence Life, “Jefferson Hall,” University of Mary Washington, http://students.umw.edu/residencelife/jefferson/ (Accessed April 4, 2014).

Jepson Science Center was opened in April 1998, and became the home of the departments of biology, chemistry, physics, geology, and environmental science. These science departments were previously housed in Combs Hall on the opposite end of campus, but by the 1990s had become too large to be housed there. Jepson was originally to be built facing Simpson Library along Campus Walk, but was moved to its position near Alvey and Arrington Halls due to difficulties with the planned site. The construction of the new science center, a major boost to Mary Washington, was helped in large part by Robert and Alice Jepson. The Jepsons had previously funded a major faculty fellowship program and provided more aid in the creation of the science center, which now bears their name. Jepson Science Center is 72,000 square feet is size and features a computer lab, green house, and aquatic lab in addition to numerous classrooms and offices.1

Jepson Now Resized

Jepson, 2014
Alexandria Parrish, “Jepson,” February 19 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parrish. University of Mary Washington.

Show 1 footnote

  1. William  B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 518-19.

Trench Hill was acquired by the College in 1947. The College remodeled it and designated it for academically talented students and later for the College’s first male students.1 Eventually it became the headquarters of the Alumni Association. In 2004, it was converted to an renamed “Kalnen Inn at Trench Hill, after the alumna benefactor Elizabeth Kalnen ’37.”2

The Jepson Alumni Executive Center is 24,000-square-feet was created by incorporating an addition to Trench Hill “to create a U-shaped, tri-unit structure.”3 The gates to the Jepson Alumni Executive Center are refurbished gates from 1900 France that were commissioned by Henry Phipps, who was a business partner of Andrew Carnegie.4

Today, the Kalnen Inn and the Jepson Executive Alumni continue as a bed-and-breakfast and as a venue available for events.

Jepson Alumni Center (formally Kalnen Inn and Trench Hill), September 22, 2013

Kalnen Inn, September 22, 2013
Jessica Reingold, "Kalnen Inn," September 22, 2013, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

Jepson Alumni Center, September 22, 2013

Jepson Alumni Executive Center, September 22, 2013
Jessica Reingold, "Jepson Alumni Executive Center," September 22, 2013, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.


Fountain at the Jepson Alumni Center, September 22, 2013

Fountain at the Jepson Alumni Executive Center, September 22, 2013
Jessica Reingold, "Fountain at the Jepson Executive Alumni Center," September 22, 2013, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

Show 4 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 57.
  2. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 547.
  3. Ibid.
  4. Ibid.

Lee Hall opened in 1951 during the construction boom of President Simpson, and was named after Anne Hill Carter Lee, mother of Robert E. Lee. 1 Though most simply refer to the building as Lee Hall today, it held the name of Anne Carter Lee Hall, or just ACL,  for many years. It was constructed as mainly an administrative building, but also contained a ballroom and a pool, the latter of which was converted into a cafe during the 1970s.2 The terrace of Lee Hall was traditionally the site of the formal Junior Ring Dance and other celebrations. 3 In 2007, Lee Hall underwent major renovations, completely closing until 2009 when it reopened with the popular addition of a newly refurbished cafe, The Underground.  It is currently home to the Campus Bookstore, Student Services Center, administrative offices, Office of Admissions, the James Farmer Multicultural Center, Career Services, Counseling and Psychological Services, and the university’s Health Center.

 

Lee Hall, 2014

Lee Hall, 2014
Jessica Reingold, "Lee," February 23, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

Show 3 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), page 57.
  2. Ibid., 215.
  3. Ibid., 887.

Originally a bridge, “The Link” was constructed in 2012 as a connecting building between Randolph Hall and Mason Hall.  It serves as a meeting and study space for students at UMW.

The bridge between Randolph and Mason, no date H. Bagby, "Bridge between Randolph and Mason Halls," H. Bagby Collection, Simpson Library Special Collections, University of Mary Washington

The Bridge Between Randolph and Mason, n.d.
H. Bagby, "Bridge between Randolph and Mason Halls," H. Bagby Collection, Simpson Library Special Collections, University of Mary Washington.

The Link, 2014 Jessica Reingold, "The Link," February 19, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

The Link, 2014
Jessica Reingold, "The Link," February 19, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

 

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