University of Mary Washington Then & Now

A Photography Exhibition

Posts in the Other Buildings and Locations category

Built in 1950, Mercer Hall was the College’s infirmary.1 It continued as the campus infirmary into the 1970s, and was remodeled to include a counseling center.”2

Mercer Hall is currently under renovation. After renovation, Mercer will continue to house the Office of Judicial Affairs and the Honor Council, and will also become the home to the Psychology Department, which was “displaced by the demolition of Chandler Hall in 2013.”3 The renovation should be finished by “April 2015.”4

Mercer, March 21, 2014

Mercer, March 21, 2014
Jessica Reingold, "Mercer," March 21, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

Show 4 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 57.
  2. Ibid., 215.
  3. Lindley Estes, “More construction begins at University of Mary Washington,” (Fredericksburg, VA.) Free Lance-Star, March 22, 2014, http://news.fredericksburg.com/newsdesk/2014/03/22/more-construction-begins-on-campus/ (Accessed April 6, 2014).
  4. Ibid.

“In June 1930 Governor John Garland Pollard authorized the construction of the new kitchen and dining hall” 1  with living quarters in the basement for the Home Economics Department, and in spring 1931 the new dining hall was opened for occupancy. 2

Today, Seacobeck Hall is still the primary dining hall, and  it now offers three dining rooms for students with their own unique cuisine and décor: The Washington Diner, The Smart Market, and the UMW Bistro.  The Historic Dining Room at Seacobeck is used Monday-Friday for UMW faculty, staff, and their guests.3

Seacobeck Now

Seacobeck Hall, 2014
Alexandra Parrish, "Seacobeck Hall," March 21, 2014, Personal collection of Alexandria Parrish, University of Mary Washington.

Show 3 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley, Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 31.
  2. Ibid., 31
  3. University of Mary Washington Dining, “The Restaurants at Seacobeck,” University of Mary Washington,http://www.umwdining.com/locations/index.html (Accessed April 6, 2014).

“In 1936, financed by donations from graduating classes and private individuals (most notably Mrs. A. B. Chandler), gates were constructed below Monroe Hall at the Sunken Road entrance to the College.”1

Although the Sunken Road Gate is not the main entrance to the University today, it is still regularly used as an entrance to the campus. The main entrance to the University is the Double Drive Gate off of College Avenue.

Class Officers In Front Of Gate, 1948

Class Officers In Front Of Gate, 1948
From left to right: Lois Saunier, senior class; Barbara Haislip, junior class; Carolyn Myers, sophomore class; Sara Katherine Jordan, freshman class
"Class Officers In Front Of Gate," 1948, Centennial Collection, UMW Digital Archives, University of Mary Washington.


Sunken Road Gate, March 21, 2014

Sunken Road Gate, March 21, 2014
Jessica Reingold, "Sunken Road Gate," March 21, 2014, Personal Collection of Jessica Reingold, University of Mary Washington.

Show 1 footnote

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 33.

Woodard Campus Center was opened in 1987, named in honor of Prince Briggs Woodard, President of the University from 1974 to 1982. Woodard sits in the depression “roughly between Willard and Melchers,” which was a difficult site for construction. However, it provided the opportunity to expand Campus Walk and link the main body of the school with Goolrick Hall and the northern end of campus. The upper floor features the Great Hall, an open space used for special events which featured mobile partitions to create temporary meeting spaces.1 Woodard is currently home to the Eagle’s Nest dining facilities, the University Post Office, and UMW’s radio station. The Great Hall and UMW Commuters’ Lounge are now inaccessible as much of the building is now under renovation. When construction is complete, Woodard will housed the College of Business.2

Woodard Campus Center, 2014

Woodard, 2014
Alexandria Parrish, “Woodard,” February 19 2014, Personal Collection of Alexandria Parrish. University of Mary Washington.

Show 2 footnotes

  1. William B. Crawley Jr., University of Mary Washington: A Centennial History, 1908-2008 (Fredericksburg: University of Mary Washington Foundation, 2008), 370-72.
  2. Lindley Estes, “More construction begins at University of Mary Washington,” (Fredericksburg, VA.) Free Lance-Star, March 22, 2014, http://news.fredericksburg.com/newsdesk/2014/03/22/more-construction-begins-on-campus/(Accessed April 28, 2014).
css.php